Tag Archives: Remote Desktop

How to Create a Login Form for MS Access

Before creating a Login Form, you need to set up a user table that can verify the login ID and password on the Login Form. The step of creating Login Form can be followed below:

Create a table tblSecurity with a SecurityID and SecurityLevel field and add admin for SecurityID =1 and user for SecurityID =2

securitystep1

Create a table tblUser with a UserName, UserLogin, UserSecurity and UserPassword fields.  Remember to add an input mask on the password field so that passwords are not blatantly visible in the table.

securitystep2

I choose to display the type of user rather than just the raw number of the User’s security level by using the Lookup options in the design view. This way the UserType field is a number corresponding to the User’s security level because it refers to the SecurityID in the tblSecurity but displays the user’s UserType in text (admin, user etc.). You can create the UserType field from the Lookup Wizard on the dropdown of Data Type column.

usertype

Create a Login Form from the Dialog form design. Then customize the form to your liking.

how-to-create-a-user-login-form-in-ms-access

Create two text boxes in the Login Form as txtUserName with label Login Name and txtPassword with label Password

create-a-login-form-ms-access-2016

Under the “On Click Event” of the Cancel button, add the Embedded Macro with a QuitAccess command to exit the program or Access application

how-to-creat-a-login-form-macro

Create a Navigation and Admin Form area to reroute your users to the appropriate area of your database application.

Under On Click Event of the OK button, add the VBA code below under the Event Procedure

Option Compare Database

Private Sub Command1_Click()
Dim User As String
Dim UserLevel As Integer
Dim TempPass As String
Dim ID As Integer
Dim UserName As String
Dim TempID As String


If IsNull(Me.txtUserName) Then
 MsgBox "Please enter UserName", vbInformation, "Username required"
 Me.txtUserName.SetFocus
ElseIf IsNull(Me.txtPassword) Then
 MsgBox "Please enter Password", vbInformation, "Password required"
 Me.txtPassword.SetFocus
Else
 If (IsNull(DLookup("UserLogin", "tblUser", "UserLogin = '" & Me.txtUserName.Value & "' And UserPassword = '" & Me.txtPassword.Value & "'"))) Then
 MsgBox "Invalid Username or Password!"
 Else
 TempID = Me.txtUserName.Value
 UserName = DLookup("[UserName]", "tblUser", "[UserLogin] = '" & Me.txtUserName.Value & "'")
 UserLevel = DLookup("[UserType]", "tblUser", "[UserLogin] = '" & Me.txtUserName.Value & "'")
 TempPass = DLookup("[UserPassword]", "tblUser", "[UserLogin] = '" & Me.txtUserName.Value & "'")
 UserLogin = DLookup("[UserLogin]", "tblUser", "[UserLogin] = '" & Me.txtUserName.Value & "'")
 DoCmd.Close
 If (TempPass = "password") Then
 MsgBox "Please change Password", vbInformation, "New password required"
 DoCmd.OpenForm "frmUserinfo", , , "[UserLogin] = " & UserLogin
 Else
 'open different form according to user level
 If UserLevel = 1 Then ' for admin
 DoCmd.OpenForm "Admin Form"
 Else
 DoCmd.OpenForm "Navigation Form"
 End If

 End If
 End If
End If
End Sub

Private Sub Form_Load()
Me.txtUserName.SetFocus
End Sub

Set the Login Form to display immediately when the Access Database is opened. Go to File->Options and select the Current Database option from the list. Then set the Login Form as the display form.

set-a-display-form-for-when-access-first-opens

It should be noted that while this login procedure is helpful to have permissions and different roles withing your Access database and may be needed for our Remote Desktop Hosting – it is not necessary for any hosted Access Web App or Sharepoint Application since you can use the Sharepoint user roles and login procedures rather than handling it within the Access Database itself.

Posted in Access 2016, Remote Desktop Hosting, Tutorial | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

How to Decrypt a MS Access Database

As a reminder, it is critical that you remember your password  — if you forget your password, there is no method by which it can be retrieved.

Step 1: Select the Microsoft access database file that you want to open and choose Open Exclusive.

Open encrypted access database

Step 2: Once you select the encrypted access database and are ready to open it in Microsoft Access. A dialog would pop up to ask for database open password.

Step 3: Type database password in Enter database password box. Click OK.

enter-password-to-open-access-database

Step 4: Remove a password from a database

When you remove a password from a database, you can restore it at any time (or replace it with another password) by repeating the steps in our post about How to Encrypt an Access Database.

Go to the File->Info section and select Decrypt Database.

decrypt ms access database online

After prompting you for the current password one last time, all encryption will be removed and your database will no longer require a password to open.

Posted in Access 2007, Access 2010, Access 2013, Access 2016, Tips & Tricks | Tagged , | Leave a comment

How to Encrypt an Access Database

If you are using our Remote Desktop Hosting to host your database and you want increased security, you may want to consider protecting and encrypting your MS Access database with a password.  If you know the password for an encrypted database, you can also decrypt the database and remove its password. This article explains how to encrypt a database by using a database password, and how to decrypt a database and remove its password.

In earlier versions of Access, you could create user accounts and passwords using a feature called user-level security. This topic does not discuss user-level security, which is not available when you use the .accdb file format.

If you encrypt a database and then lose the password, you will be unable to use the database. You cannot remove a database password if you do not know the password. Access Hosting cannot recover or decrypt an Access Database on our servers without your database password.

How to Encrypt an MS Access Database File

This is a process of setting a password to encrypt access database, restricting access to Access database.

Step 1: When access database file is open in Microsoft Access, tab File > Info.

Encrypt Password location in Access 2010

Encrypt with Password location in Access 2010

Encrypt Access 2016 database

Encrypt with Password Location in Access 2016 is the same place

Step 2: Click Encrypt with Password button under the info tab for the database.

access-database-open-prompt-message

Sometimes, maybe you will receive a message to ask you to open the access database with Open Exclusive mode at first, otherwise you cannot encrypt database. When this happens, click OK and follow the prompting message.

Step 3: In Set Database Password dialog, enter a powerful complex password in the Password box and type it again in the Verify box. Click OK to finish MS access database encryption.encrypt-access-database-with-password

DO NOT FORGET THIS PASSWORD!

Remember that this is an optional and additional security feature for our Remote Desktop Hosting services and blocks access to your database even from our own support technicians.  If you forget this encryption password, Access Hosting cannot decrypt or restore your database.  If you have any further questions about this feature, please open a support ticket at http://support.accesshosting.com

Posted in Access 2007, Access 2010, Access 2013, Access 2016, Tips & Tricks | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

3 Great Reasons to Choose Microsoft Access

link-to-outlook

The database market is divided among four major players: MS Access, Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL. Due to accessibility and focus on user interface, MS Access has garnered some negative press as being unsuitable for professional level database development. However, depending on the needs of the organization, there are many compelling reasons to choose MS Access as your business database software.

1. It’s widely distributed

MS Access is bundled with the MS Office suite, making it the most widely available desktop database program in the world. This also makes it one of the most affordable options for businesses, which tend to purchase businesses licenses of MS Office. The common interface among all the MS Office programs makes it easy to import and move data to and from the database without having to resort to specialized software. Due to the popularity of the product, support for MS Access is also very good, with plenty of online tutorials and articles available, in addition to Microsoft’s excellent customer service.

2. It’s user-friendly yet powerful

One of the main benefits of MS Access is its ease of use. Even users new to database development can pick up the basics quite easily, as everything is presented in an intuitive manner. Much of the user interface in MS Access is designed to assist users with creating and editing tables, and there are many templates available to ensure that the database meets organizational needs. MS Access also provides options for importing data from other databases, and provides troubleshooting tips for every step of the way.

Despite this focus on ease of use, MS Access users have access to powerful SQL tools that allow for rapid development. MS Access is also .NET friendly, meaning that developers wanting finer control of software development can take advantage of the ease of use and functionality of MS Access.

3. It has excellent third-party support

Due to the widespread popularity of MS Access, there are many third-party plugins and developmental tools that are available. This means that MS Access is far more flexible than other databases, making it easier to customize and adapt to the changing needs of your business. In addition, there are many more external consultants well-versed in MS Access, and they are generally more affordable than consultants for Oracle and SQL Server.

MS Access is an excellent database choice if your organization requires a database that is easy to use and that has established, reputable support structures. MS Access is powerful enough to meet the demands of most small to medium businesses.

Best of all you can utilize Access Hosting superior hosting infrastructure to further bolster your Access Database and get it in the cloud easily and securely.  All of our services offer a free 30 day trial so that you can easily test everything with Microsoft Access to make sure that it meets your needs.

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The Top 10 Reasons to Split an Access database

Splitting your Access database offers numerous advantages, including increased flexibility, security, efficiency, and scalability.

Access is an amazing and powerful desktop application that lets you store data and interface with that data in the same file. You can even design your own applications with Access.  Unfortunately, the only way to utilize the full power of MS Access  is to develop traditional local desktop based applications.  Luckily, you can take your powerful MS Access applications with split frontend and backend to the cloud with Access Hosting’s Remote Desktop Hosting.

Most developers agree that a split database is easier to protect and maintain but unfortunately this powerful approach is completely incompatible with SharePoint.  When you split an Access database file, you end up with two files instead of just one (often the backend is an .mdb file):

  • The backend stores all of the data in relational table (you can always move the backend to SQL for even more power and accessibility)
  • The front end stores all of your interface objects: forms, reports, queries etc.
  • By linking the two files, users can view and manipulate the data in the backend via the forms and reports in the front end. This arrangement solves a number of problems inherent to the Access file structure.

Now onto the top 10 reasons to split a Microsoft Access Database:

1: Multiple users share the data
Perhaps the biggest incentive for splitting a database is to supply data to multiple users over a local network or on the cloud via Access Hosting. By storing the backend on a local file server, SQL or other cloud based solution and distributing the front end to workstations and users, many users can access and manipulate the data at the same time without running into record locking and other problems.

2: Everyone’s using the same data at the same time
By splitting a database, you know that all users are accessing the most current data because everyone’s accessing the SAME data. Not only are they all accessing the same data, they can all update it at the same time. That means a change made by one user is almost immediately available to all other users.

Having a backend moves all the data into a single database file (.mdb) or backend ODBC connection (SQL, mySQL etc). That means there’s only one copy of that data to manage and protect. Changes are immediate and available to all authorized users. Any administrative and development duties are implemented in the backend file, once.

3: Your data is better protected
Whole books have been written on database security, but it’s enough for you to know that you must protect your data. One of the easiest ways is to split your database. Placing your tables in a backend file protects your database design because users can’t directly access the tables via the interface objects in the front end.  Therefore, they can’t alter or delete tables, even accidentally. Most of the users working in the front end won’t realize they’re actually working with two separate files, so splitting the database will have NO Negative impact on your users.

However, this arrangement is not a comprehensive security lock on design. Users who know what they’re doing can still open the backend, if they have access to it. Just bear in mind that splitting the database will minimize accidents — but it won’t stop someone who’s determined to get at your tables.

If security is a of utmost importance, Access Hosting’s Remote Desktop hosting adds an additional layer of security – requiring users to login to the MS Access frontend.  Users don’t even need to have Access installed on their computer!  We even offer HIPAA compliant dedicated server solutions for healthcare and medical data.  Moving your data to a SQL backend also adds additional security and features to an Access application.

4: You can easily scale your application for the future
If there’s any chance that your Access database will grow out of its skin, consider splitting the database. It’s easier to upsize a split database to SQL Server (or some other larger relational database system) because you can easily link the existing front end to SQL Server tables. That way, the organization has the advantage of storing data in a larger database with most of the perks that come with doing so, while still using the interface and all of the reports and queries that you originally designed in the Access front end.

5:  The user interface is easy to modify
Most databases grow and change with the business; they require new features or modified business rules. Changes to existing tables are rare, if you properly normalized them early on. Most changes will be in the front end in the form of new or modified forms and reports.

As long as your database is split, testing and implementing changes to the front end can occur with little or no disruption to users. You simply link the development front end to the production backend and test away. This won’t always be the case, of course, but testing new interface objects is easier in a split database configuration.

6: Deploying a new front end is a snap
If the user interface and data are stored in the same database, you must REPLACE the entire database EVERY time changes are made in a local environment.  With our RDP solution, you can keep your database and app contained all in one file and more easily replace them on our server in 1 location, but it’s still not ideal.  That’s a lot of unnecessary work and is especially problematic if no one in-house has the expertise to do it for you or if you have to visit each user’s workstation.

In a split database configuration, you simply replace the front-end ms access file and relink the tables. It takes a few minutes and requires little interruption of users.  With our RDP solution, you can even login and do this for every user to completely eliminate any application support issues.

7: It makes life easier for offsite developers
A split database is easier for offsite developers to maintain and upgrade. The developer works offsite to implement changes and enhancements to the front end and then ships the new version to someone in-house (or uploads it directly) who has the technical expertise to deploy it. This latter process is a simple copy and relinking task that doesn’t require high-end expertise. You can train someone to do it or even talk someone through it over the phone. Many developers write a routine that automates the process. All the in-house technician has to do is double-click the installation file. This opens up a lot of long distance opportunities that a developer just couldn’t manage as easily with a single database file.  Access Developers out there should interested in making their lives easier and moving their clients to a cloud based hosting solution should contact us about our Partner and Referral program.

8: Geography’s not a problem
A split database allows users in different locations to access the same data. For example, the backend could be stored on our servers in our SAS70 data center in Philadelphia, but users from all over the country can access the data via their local systems connected to a SQL backend.

9: Corruption is limited
Access databases are prone to corruption. One of the easiest ways to avoid this problem is to implement a split database, which is less prone to corruption.  Nothing is worse than having a user corrupt your backend data!

10: It’s easier to get individual users back on track
Security in the front end is one way to limit user interference. However, some users require more flexibility than others and there are always trade-offs. Some applications will require tight front-end security, while others will allow more freedom to tinker.

When a user tinkers to the point of destruction, a split database is easier to repair. Rather than bringing the entire application and all its users to a screeching halt, you have only one user who’s unable to work, momentarily because they broke their specific Access frontend and not the entire application. The fix is usually as simple as recopying the front end and overwriting the changes that the person made.

I hope this was helpful to people who have an Access application at their business.  If anyone is looking to learn more about our Remote Desktop and or SQL backend hosting options, please do not hesitate to contact us or sign up for a free trial to try it for yourself.

Posted in Access 2003, Access 2007, Access 2010, Access 2013, Remote Desktop, Remote Desktop Hosting, SQL Hosting, Tips & Tricks | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Remote Desktop Storage Upgrade for 2015

Access Hosting is proud to announce that for 2015 we have increased the storage quotas on all of our Remote Desktop Hosting plans for customers seeking an easy way to move their Access Hosting Database to the web without any modifications.

Access Hosting, the leading hosting company for Microsoft Access services and solutions has doubled and tripled the storage on their Access Remote Desktop plans. Customers in need of bringing their Microsoft Access web application to the cloud can now do so without the need for expensive hardware or costly setup.

Interested customers will now enjoy 2GB of storage with the $29/month Access Pro Virtual Desktop and 3GB of storage with the $49/month Office Pro Plus Remote Desktop plan. Anyone interested in trying out this hosting service can sign up for a free 30 day trial at http://accesshosting.com/remote-desktop-hosting/free-trial

Remote Desktop Services allows you to keep your Access 2007, 2010, or 2013 Database running “as-is” online in the cloud. Using the latest advances in Microsoft Hypervisor technology we can create a seamless single click operating environment for your existing Access database that allows you to run your application without modification. This approach allows multiple users to connect concurrently to the cloud from any PC and experience the program as if it was running locally on their desktop. Pricing starts at just $19/month and we offer a free trial for qualified customers.  You can learn more at http://accesshosting.com/remote-desktop-hosting/

Posted in Access 2007, Access 2010, Access 2013, Access and the iPad, Access on the Kindle, Remote Desktop, Remote Desktop Hosting | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to collect data in MS Access via email with Outlook

Beginning with version 2007, Microsoft Access included a feature that seamlessly links your database table to Outlook and makes it easier to collect user data via email messages. This quick tutorial will show you the steps for setting up the email template for collecting the data as well as the steps for processing the collected data.

Creating the email message

Follow these steps to create the email message:

  1. Select the table that you need to collect the data for from the Navigation Pane.
  2. From the External Data tab on the Ribbon, in the Collect Data group, click on the Create E-mail button.
  3. The Collect data through e-mail messages Wizard should open as show in Figure 1.
    collectdata1

    Figure 1

  4. Click Next. The next screen will present you with the option to choose the type of email form you want to use. You can only use either HTML or InfoPath forms (see Figure 2).
    collectdata2

    Figure 2

    Select HTML if your users do not have InfoPath installed on their machines.

  5. Click Next after you have made your choice.
  6. If your table contains existing data, the next screen that shows up is where you’ll choose whether the data you’re collecting are new information or for updating the existing data in your table (see Figure 3).
    Figure 3

    Figure 3

  7. Click Next after you have made your selection.
  8. The next screen (see Figure 4) allows you to select which fields from your table you would like to include in the email message for collecting the data. You can set the order of the fields or change the label captions for each field.
    Figure 4

    Figure 4

  9. After you have selected all the fields you want to collect, click Next to see the next screen (see Figure 5).
    Figure 5

    Figure 5

  10. This screen allows you to specify which Outlook folder will be used to store the email replies for the collected data. You can change the default location by clicking on the folder’s name and then switch to the Outlook window and select or create a new folder (see Figure 6).
    Figure 6

    Figure 6

  11. From the same screen (see Figure 5), you can also specify if you want all email replies to be processed automatically, which means that the data collected will be automatically added to your Access table. To control how the data is processed, you can click on the link labeled “Set properties to control the automatic processing of replies.” This would open up the Options screen (see Figure 7).
    Figure 7

    Figure 7

  12. From the screen shown in Figure 5, click Next to move on the next step.
  13. The next screen specifies how you would like to provide the email addresses for the recipients of your message (see Figure 8).
    Figure 8

    Figure 8

  14. If you select to provide the email addresses from an Access table, clicking Next will present the screen shown in Figure 9.
    Figure 9

    Figure 9

  15. Select the email address field from the current or related table and then click Next.
  16. The next screen allows you to specify the subject line and body of the message (see Figure 10).
    Figure 10

    Figure 10

  17. Click Next to see the next screen (see Figure 11). This screen is informational only.
    Figure 11

    Figure 11

  18. Click Next again. The next screen allows you to select specific recipients for the email message, send the message to all recipients (see Figure 12).
    Figure 12

    Figure 12

  19. When you’re ready to send the email message, click Send.
  20. When your users get the email message, all they have to do is reply back by filling out the form in the message with the information being requested.

Managing Automatic Reply Processing

After you have set up your data collection email, you can go to the Message Options screen to change its settings. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. From the External Data tab on the Ribbon, in the Collect Data group, click on the Manage Replies button. The Manage Data Collection Messages dialog window should come up (see Figure 13).
    Figure 13

    Figure 13

  2. With the data collection message template you want to modify highlighted, click on the Message Options button.
  3. The Collecting Data Using E-Mail Options dialog window should open up (see Figure 14).
    Figure 14

    Figure 14

  4. From this screen, you can check or uncheck the options you prefer.
  5. Click OK to close the Options window.
  6. Click Close on the Manage Data Collection Messages dialog window.

Processing Replies

If you did not set up your email data collection to be processed automatically by Outlook, or if a reply failed to be processed, you can manually process each reply by following these steps:

  1. Locate the folder you designated for storing the collected data in Outlook.
  2. Right-click on the user’s reply you want to process and select Export data to Microsoft Access.
  3. On the Export data to Microsoft Access dialog window, verify the data to be added to the table and click OK.
  4. If the export is successful, you should get the confirmation window shown in Figure 15.
    Figure 15

    Figure 15

  5. You must repeat these steps for each reply you want to process.

Conclusion

Since Access 2007, database developers can now automate external data collection via email messages using Outlook. If you have users who need to send out surveys or questionnaires and want to avoid the manual process of collecting feedback, you might consider giving this new feature a try.  More importantly this type of integration is actually possible via a web browser and in the cloud with Access hosting’s remote desktop hosting. All you need to do is sign up for an Office Pro plan with MS Access and Outlook to try it free for 30 days.

Posted in Access 2007, Access 2010, Access 2013 | Tagged , , | 11 Comments

Running MS Access Applications on an Android Kindle Fire

Running your Access application on the Kindle Fire can be accomplished in just a few simple steps.

img_52b899958a37e

Here’s what to do:

1. Download the Microsoft Remote Desktop APK and move it over to the Kindle Fire via USB or emailing it to yourself. Note that this is a zip file and you will need to unzip it before moving it over.

2. Change your default Android Kindle settings to allow This is known as “sideloading” your application into Android. You may need to setup the Kindle to accept unknown applicaitons first by doing this:

Fire Settings

Click your settings tab

Fire Applications

Navigate to Applications

Fire Settings 2

and allow applications to be installed from unknown sources (set to On)

3. Install the Microsoft Remote Desktop application to your Kindle.  You can do this by navigating to your Downloads folder (if you emailed it to yourself) or the folder that you placed it in via your USB connection.  We’ve found the free ES File Explorer app to be incredible helpful way to browse your Kindle’s Harddrive.

img_52b888ad593f2

3. Pin the newly installed Microsoft Remote Desktop application to your home screen

new RDP

4. Configure the Remote Desktop Connection. If you are using our Remote Desktop Hosting Service  this information will be provided via email.

rdp config

5. Connect the Remote Desktop and run your Access application. Our Remote Desktop Hosting Service is available for Access 2007/2010/2013 and the Access 2010/2013 Runtime

This new version of the Remote Desktop client supports all of the Kindle gestures and features easy to navigate keyboard and mouse touch screen equivalents. Your users will find that the Access .mdb and .accdb applications they know and love work just fine on the Android Kindle Fire Tablet.

 

 

Posted in Access 2003, Access 2007, Access 2010, Access 2013, Access on the Kindle, Remote Desktop, Remote Desktop Hosting, Tips & Tricks, Video Tutorial | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Announcing Excel 2013 Power Business Intelligence Hosting

excel2013 power view

Access Hosting is proud to announce our new Excel Power Business Intelligence Hosting for only $99/month.  This new plan combines the flexibility of our Remote Desktop hosting solutions with the power of SQL server hosting.  This powerful solution is possible NOW without the expense of Office 365 or a SharePoint server and allows for substantial business insights through PowerPivot and Power View.

excelpowerbi

Power View is an interactive data exploration, visualization, and presentation experience that encourages intuitive ad-hoc reporting. Power View is a powerful feature of Microsoft Excel 2013 that can be utilized in ANY HTML5 compatible web browser with our Power RDP technology.

You can learn more about this product and sign-up for a 30 Day Free Trial of Excel 2013 Hosting here.

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Does Remote Desktop Hosting work with Macintosh

8-1-2013 4-20-10 PM

Absolutely! you can user our Virtual Remote Desktop hosting on your Mac and a slew of other devices.  Windows PCs come with the Remote Desktop Protocol preinstalled and if you have a Mac with Office, you’ll have RDP installed already.

If you don’t have Office for the Mac, you can download the RDP client for Mac for Free.  You can learn more about the Mac OSX RDP client from Microsoft here: http://www.microsoft.com/mac/remote-desktop-client

or download it directly from here:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/search.aspx?q=microsoft%20remote%20desktop%20connection%20for%20mac&p=0&r=10&t=&s=Relevancy~Descending

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Remote Desktop Virtual Appliance NOW only $10 per User!

We are happy to announce that our Remote Desktop Virtual Machine has undergone some price changes and is now cheaper than ever.  Our RDP Virtual Appliance is only $299/month and comes with 4GB of RAM and up to 10 users.  Access 2010 or Access 2007 will come pre-installed on every remote desktop.  With RDP, there are absolutely NO CHANGES necessary to your Access Application to get it running in the cloud. Simply copy/paste it over to your Remote Virtual Desktop.

Additional users are now only $10 per month! and the entire Microsoft Office suite (Word, Excel, Outlook, and Powerpoint) can be added to any virtual desktop for only $10 per user per month!  These plans come with No setup fee and NO long term commitment.  Best of all, you can install your own software and completely customize your RDP environment.

Check out our RDP Hosting Virtual Appliance

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Introduction and Getting Started Video for RDP Hosting

This video introduces you to our Remote Desktop Hosting service. It shows you how easy it is to get started using RDP hosting with our free trial and how to easily copy/paste your local Access database up into the cloud.

To learn more visit our website

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