Category Archives: Access 2013

How to Connect Microsoft Access to QuickBooks

QuickBooks is an accounting application that many individuals and small business owners use to manage their finances. It allows you to maintain a variety of database files such as customer contact information, budgets and inventory records.

Microsoft Access, on the other hand, is a broader database application, which can store everything from mailing lists to financial data and everything in between. While many users enjoy the convenient financial tracking that QuickBooks provides, they also like the flexibility and advanced query options that Microsoft Access offers.

The good news is that you can merge these two different applications. This allows you to record your financial and business records efficiently, while still being able to create a variety of queries for analytical purposes.

In order to connect Microsoft Access to QuickBooks, you will need to use an ODBC driver like QODBC. While this driver does not import files from or into these applications, it does allow Microsoft Access users to view their QuickBook files externally.

You will still be able to be able to create all the tables, queries, reports, modules and macros using data stored in your QuickBook files, just as you would your files stored in Microsoft Access. Data within these files is updated instantly whether you are working in QuickBook or Microsoft Access.

The process for connecting Microsoft Access and QuickBooks is fairly easy and can be completed within just a few minutes. Below is a look at the seven steps you need to take to connect these two applications.

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  1. Start by opening up your Microsoft Access application. You can do this by clicking the Start button on your desktop, selecting Microsoft Office and choosing Microsoft Access. Select the Blank Access Database Click the OK button.
  2. A default name will appear in the File Name Feel free to edit the name of the file to better meet your specific needs. This name cannot match any other file name within your Microsoft Access database. When you are done, click the Create button.
  3. Click the New tab at the top of the box.
  4. The Microsoft Access database wizard box will appear. Select Link Table. Click the OK
  5. Locate the Files of Type box at the bottom of the screen. Use the drop down box to change the Files of Type from Microsoft Access to ODBC Databases.
  6. The Select Data Source box will appear. Select QuickBook Data or another DSN Data Source you set up with your QODBC driver. Click on the OK
  7. The Link Table will appear, which lists all the tables from QuickBook that you can now access with Microsoft Access. Select all the QuickBook tables you want to connect to Microsoft Office. Click the OK

You will now be able to view all your QuickBook tables in Microsoft Access. It is important to note that this process technically does not import your QuickBook files into Microsoft Access. Instead, Microsoft Access will open these external files through the QODBC driver.

This allows changes to be updated instantly whether you are working in QuickBooks or in Microsoft Access. This creates fewer errors and ensures your records stay up to date at all times.

If you create a table in QuickBooks, you will need to repeat steps one through seven to make sure these new files are connected to your Microsoft Access.

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5 Reasons Why Microsoft Access Schools Quickbooks

You have many choices for your business accounting needs, and Quickbooks frequently comes up in conversation. However, that doesn’t necessary make it perfect for your organization. Microsoft Access gives you a Quickbooks alternative with five compelling reasons to add it to your technology stack.

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1. Intuitive for Microsoft Office Users

How long do you want to wait for end users to get up to speed on new software? Every minute they spend in training takes away from the time they could devote to critical business tasks. Microsoft Access offers a familiar interface that helps cut down on the learning curve. Plus, you gain deep integration with the Microsoft Office software suite, so if you’re already using these applications extensively, Access makes the most sense. Excel users, in particular, get a lot out of pulling their spreadsheet data into an Access database.

2. Highly Customizable

Quickbooks is good at its primary function, but when your needs change and go outside of these parameters, you run into trouble. Microsoft Access offers a flexible database that adapts to your current business environment rather than making you build workflows held back by application limitations. Many companies want more agility to respond to new changes in their industry, especially in quickly changing sectors.

If you have to switch out to new solutions every time you go through a market disruption, you end up in a perpetual deployment cycle and the associated decrease in productivity. Access empowers your organization with tools that can address many possible scenarios, whether you predict them or not. Countless industries evolve overnight due to high-tech startups, so being on your toes and ready to shift with the tides is an essential part of doing business.

3. Strong Network

Microsoft Access is used by millions globally, which creates a robust ecosystem of consultants, developers and other professionals with significant experience working with this tool. You can find a specialist offering deep familiarity with Microsoft Access if you don’t already have the necessary expertise available in house. Deployment is a breeze when you have experienced help guiding you along your path. Online Deployment for Web Databases is even easier with Access Hosting’s plans. You also have extensive access to training materials, should you want to invest in skills development for your own staff.

4. Extensive Third-Party Integration

Modern business infrastructure calls for organization-wide integration. Both Quickbooks and Access offer this feature, but Access ends up with more options due to its broad applications. Most of Quickbooks’ integrations revolve around accounting tie-ins, while Access finds its way into many software categories and business sectors.

5. Macro Creation

You don’t want to waste man hours on repetitive tasks. Access opens up macros for your end users, which can drastically increase overall productivity. Your staff gets to focus on high-value tasks that require their knowledge and skills, rather than going through a painful manual process. The macros you create are highly customized to your company’s workflow, rather than following a pre-set function that uses its own task list.

Ultimately, you have to choose the system that makes the most sense for your company. If you only foresee yourself having basic accounting needs, Quickbooks is a fine option. However, should you develop more complex requirements or a desire to branch out into a fully customized system for your organization, Microsoft Access delivers a flexible and powerful tool to create this foundation.

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Download the Access 2016 Runtime

The Microsoft Access 2016 runtime has been released.

The wait is over for Access 2016 Runtime. Here are the download links for the last 4 versions of the MS Access Runtime environment. Remember that you can use these runtime packages to deploy Access Applications free of charge. They make a great low cost solution for putting legacy Access applications on the internet, the iPad, and most Android devices WITHOUT the hassle and expense of conversion using our Remote Desktop Hosting and SQL 2012 Hosting Plans.

Access 2016 Runtime Download

Access 2013 Runtime Download

Access 2010 Runtime Download

Access 2007 Runtime Download

Remote Desktop Hosting Plan Free Trial

SQL 2012 Hosting Plan Free Trial

 

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Learn about the Differences Between MS Access and QuickBooks

When your business is growing, you need to keep regular track of your finances. Microsoft Access and QuickBooks are two programs that can help you achieve this, but which system will work best for you? You want to make the right choice to fulfill your business needs while saving time. Discover the key differences between these two data management programs to help you choose.

Customization Capabilities

Both Microsoft Access and QuickBooks are useful for collecting and managing data, especially for accounting. Both programs are also available in different formats to accommodate business size, but they differ in customization capabilities.

Small businesses often find QuickBooks to be a simple tool to manage their financial transactions. Alternatively, Microsoft Access is a more robust database management system that allows its users to build and develop applications unique to their business needs. It allows users to customize databases and templates and automate apps without the need of a developer.

There are even times when a MS Access database solution needs to integrate with Quickbooks and pull in financial data.

Ramp-Up Time

The time it takes to learn a system can affect a company’s productivity. If your business is implementing tools that require extensive research to use, then you have to assess whether it’s worth using that tool. QuickBooks is a popular accounting tool many small businesses use because it’s a simple accounting software tool to get started with when you have only a few business transactions to track.

On the other hand, Microsoft Access can be complex for some businesses starting out because of the knowledge required to use some of the functions and the time it takes to acquire this knowledge. For example, if a user wants to automatically sync his apps to the cloud, he must understand SQL compatibility formats. If he doesn’t understand how to convert his applications to a format that is compatible with SQL, then he’ll need to learn SQL or outsource the job. Luckily for you, Access Hosting has this expertise and can make this process easy for you.

Limitations on Users

Both Microsoft Access and QuickBooks have a multi-user support team, but the programs differ in how many people can use the system concurrently. For example, QuickBooks is limited to 30 users, as of 2016, while Microsoft Access can handle more than 200 users at a time on an enterprise level or with an Access Hosting dedicated machine.

Cloud Capabilities

Both Microsoft Access and QuickBooks offer cloud-based versions of their software programs, but these cloud capabilities are limited to the size of the business. For example, QuickBooks does not offer cloud-supported software for its enterprise level edition.  Access Hosting is here to help you every step of the way as you move your data into the cloud and has a variety of solutions built around MS Access and Quickbooks. Private Cloud  hosting is becoming a necessity for many businesses as the need to store data online keeps growing.

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Getting Started with an Access Wep App in Sharepoint

Note : This article is written for an Access 2013 web app using Access Hosting’s Sharepoint 2013 Enterprise plan, you will need Access 2013+ and this subscription configured for Access services.

Access 2013 introduced a new way to make a database available in the browser, called the Access Web App. This first article focuses the general features and points for consideration when developing your Access database.

With the release of Access 2013, you can create now create two different types of database applications, the first is the traditional desktop database. This has traditionally been called an Access database and consists of one or more files stored on your computer, network, or remote server with Access or the Access runtime installed so that you can open and operate these databases.

The second type of database application you can create is called a 2013 web app (not to be confused with the Sharepoint 2010 Web Database). These Web Apps can only reside within Sharepoint 2013 Enterprise or newer.  They are not created and do not reside on your local computer.

No need to publish design changes!

A web app is cleverly designed so that everything is hosted on Access Hosting’s private cloud, so while you are using a desktop copy of Access to work on changing your design, all the changes you make once saved are automatically saved up to our Sharepoint solution. This means that there is no publishing process, but it also means that you can’t easily undo your changes (or mistakes). Keeping a backup of your own work is very important, but Access Hosting also backs up your entire site collection (not just the web app) every night so we can restore your entire site from a major blunder.

Your web app can be placed in your personal folder in Office 365, or created in a Team Site/Subsite. Team Site/Subsites allow for you to both collaborate with other licensed users and what are known as external users. An external user is someone with a FREE Microsoft Online account (easily obtained), and you are allowed between 500/10,000 external users depending on your subscription.

Access Web Apps run in your Browser

Access Web Apps run in your browser. This is where most of your users will interact with your application. Web Apps do not have the same robust design features as traditional desktop based applications.  When designing a web app you will find yourself switching between your installed copy of Access on your desktop computer and the runtime browser window.  You’ll have to have Access installed on your computer to make changes and design the Sharepoint Web App, but will often want to reload your browser to see your changes take effect and to visualize the end user experience.

Simplified Design Tools

The MS Access interface used to design web apps is very different than the traditional design tool so you will need to spend some time getting used to the new interface. It is relatively simple and offers standard form views and formats to get an Access web app up and running quickly in Sharepoint.

Tables and Lookups

When designing an Access Web App, it helps to forget everything you already know about designing a traditional ms access desktop database application.

Web Apps do not have the customization options and power of a traditional access application (if you have a powerful Access application developed for the desktop, you can look at our Remote Desktop hosting which lets you leave your robust database application or custom software as-is while you move it to our private cloud). Don’t worry though, your ms access database still stores data in tables. In an Access web app, you can easily jump from table to table using the navigation included on the left pane of the browser.  Tables can be re-ordered, hidden, have the captions changed and a graphical icon changed. This acts as the primary method of navigating between parts of your application.

access web apps table view

You relate your tables together using a lookup. For those familiar with desktop databases then think of a web app lookup as a combination of desktop lookups and table relationships. There is no place in the web app to view all the lookups together, these are managed individually as part of the table design process.

Once tables are linked by lookups, Access will automatically create views of the data which link the data together using the lookups. For example in an order processing system, an order will have a lookup to a list of products in that order. Access will then automatically create a view including a list of related orders for each product.

If you don’t use lookups, then you will miss out Access saving you time by the process creating views of your data automatically. Once you have these different views of your data, you will find that some of them are exceptionally useful for viewing data from a different perspective. If you find something that you don’t like, you can remove it that view from the web app.

anatomy of an access web app

Views for displaying your data

When you select a table, then on the top right of the main screen area next to the table selector is the View Selector for the chosen table. Microsoft Access will automatically create a List (Details) View and Datasheet View (Big Excel Sheet). You can then add to, remove, re-order, re-title and change the views.

Easy Data Search

access web app search

The default List View comes with a built in search bar feature. By default, your web app will search every field for whatever you type in. Once again, Access does all the hard work for you.

Restrictions on Primary Keys

A web app only supports one kind of primary key which is an auto-incrementing number (this is similar to the Autonumber data type found in a traditional desktop database and the Access Web Services 2010 primary key restrictions). The key field will automatically be named ID, but you can rename it.

Working with Existing Data

Access has great features for importing data, but you should note that upgrading a database to a Web App is very much starting from scratch; You can import your data into your web app, but you will have to design all your views, reports, forms, and other functionality from scratch (mainly because web apps can’t do everything that a desktop database can).  Before you try an import an existing desktop database, make sure that you change your desktop database so that every table has an autonumber primary key, and every foreign key is a long integer. If you don’t do this then you will run into problems.

Certain legacy data types are not supported, and those fields will not be imported. OLE Objects and Attachments are not supported. Instead there is a new Image data type which supports .gif, .jfif, .jpe, .jpeg, .jpg, or .png formats (notice that the bmp format is not supported).

If you have data in Attachments or OLE Objects, then these will need to be extracted and held outside the database in separate files, the exception is for supported image formats in

Data stored in SQL

The web app data is held in a SQL database on Access Hosting’s servers, these are automatically managed as part of your Subscription and hosting plan. You can create as many web apps as you like with our plan and are only restricted by storage (which can be upgraded at any time).

Programming Macros

To program a web app you use macros (VBA is not supported!). There are two different kinds of macros. User Interface macros manage how a user interacts with you application interface. Data macros are used to perform operations on your data.

Connecting your Web App to a Desktop Database

While Access Web Apps DO NOT support VBA programming or provide a browser based reporting capability, you can use the Access Desktop application to link to your data online to perform more complicated actions. You can quickly and easily connect to your Access Hosting Web App to create reports and more.  Check out this tutorial and video on how to use this feature.

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How to Decrypt a MS Access Database

As a reminder, it is critical that you remember your password  — if you forget your password, there is no method by which it can be retrieved.

Step 1: Select the Microsoft access database file that you want to open and choose Open Exclusive.

Open encrypted access database

Step 2: Once you select the encrypted access database and are ready to open it in Microsoft Access. A dialog would pop up to ask for database open password.

Step 3: Type database password in Enter database password box. Click OK.

enter-password-to-open-access-database

Step 4: Remove a password from a database

When you remove a password from a database, you can restore it at any time (or replace it with another password) by repeating the steps in our post about How to Encrypt an Access Database.

Go to the File->Info section and select Decrypt Database.

decrypt ms access database online

After prompting you for the current password one last time, all encryption will be removed and your database will no longer require a password to open.

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How to Encrypt an Access Database

If you are using our Remote Desktop Hosting to host your database and you want increased security, you may want to consider protecting and encrypting your MS Access database with a password.  If you know the password for an encrypted database, you can also decrypt the database and remove its password. This article explains how to encrypt a database by using a database password, and how to decrypt a database and remove its password.

In earlier versions of Access, you could create user accounts and passwords using a feature called user-level security. This topic does not discuss user-level security, which is not available when you use the .accdb file format.

If you encrypt a database and then lose the password, you will be unable to use the database. You cannot remove a database password if you do not know the password. Access Hosting cannot recover or decrypt an Access Database on our servers without your database password.

How to Encrypt an MS Access Database File

This is a process of setting a password to encrypt access database, restricting access to Access database.

Step 1: When access database file is open in Microsoft Access, tab File > Info.

Encrypt Password location in Access 2010

Encrypt with Password location in Access 2010

Encrypt Access 2016 database

Encrypt with Password Location in Access 2016 is the same place

Step 2: Click Encrypt with Password button under the info tab for the database.

access-database-open-prompt-message

Sometimes, maybe you will receive a message to ask you to open the access database with Open Exclusive mode at first, otherwise you cannot encrypt database. When this happens, click OK and follow the prompting message.

Step 3: In Set Database Password dialog, enter a powerful complex password in the Password box and type it again in the Verify box. Click OK to finish MS access database encryption.encrypt-access-database-with-password

DO NOT FORGET THIS PASSWORD!

Remember that this is an optional and additional security feature for our Remote Desktop Hosting services and blocks access to your database even from our own support technicians.  If you forget this encryption password, Access Hosting cannot decrypt or restore your database.  If you have any further questions about this feature, please open a support ticket at http://support.accesshosting.com

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Microsoft Access Explained: Reports

Reports are the primary means by which you print information from your cloud database for use by company personnel and clients. You can certainly format and print in datasheet view directly from a specific form or table, but the best way to print and summarize large sets of data from multiple places in your database is through the use of a visually appealing report.

Reports are the best way to create a printed copy of information that is extracted or calculated from data in your database. Reports have two principal advantages over other methods of printing data. First, reports can compare, summarize, subtotal and total large sets of data. And secondly, reports can be created to produce attractive invoices, purchase orders, mailing labels, presentation materials and other output you need to efficiently conduct business.

When designing a report you are able to group data and present each group separately by defining separate headers and footers for each group. You can also perform complex calculations within a group or across several groups. As with other items in Microsoft Access, you can embed pictures of charts in any section of a report. You can also embed subreports, which are particularly useful for showing related details or totals of the records that make up specific rows of your report.

All of these functions can be set up in the design view of a report, but because reports are primarily used for printing hard copies of your databases essential information the primary view used to work with reports is the print preview view.

Remember that for Access 2013 Web Apps, Reports have to exist in the Microsoft Access client so anyone who wants to view them will need an Access Frontend installed on their computer and connected to Sharepoint 2013.  Access 2010 Web Databases offer browser-based reporting features with the powerful hybrid application.  All client based reporing works in our RDP hosting environment.

Being able to print attractive reports is an essential component of Microsoft Access and will benefit your company greatly. This way you can provide hard copies of essential information, which has been drawn safely and accurately from your company’s web database. Check back in with Access Hosting for more information on all the Microsoft Access web database software can do for you and your business.

 

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Microsoft Access Explained: Queries

Queries are used to sort or filter data and display data from more than one table at a time. Although you can certainly build forms and reports that get their data directly from tables, most the time you will want to aggregate data from a number of tables at one time.

There are two basic types of queries within Microsoft Access.

A selection query takes information from the tables and queries in your database. When you define and run a select query Microsoft Access creates a recordset of the selected data. In most cases, you can work with a recordset in the same way that you would with the table or form. You can browse through it, select information from it, print it and even update data within it. Unlike a real item, a recordset doesn’t actually exist in your database. Microsoft Access creates the recordset from the data in the source tables of your query at the time you run the action and provides you with a readout of the desired information from your web or cloud database.

Action queries insert, update or delete data. These queries will be essential when learning how to work within web databases. However, it is important to understand the basic functions of queries and how they operate within simple databases because all the techniques you use for working with a single table apply equally to more complex multiple table queries and all action queries will in fact begin as simple selection queries. Action queries can be used to archive data that is no longer essential to your cloud database, so that, if the data ever becomes relevant again, the record can be easily recalled.

Within design view, you will notice that queries possess a few specific visual signifiers that you may not be familiar with as of yet. The first is the asterisk (*) symbol. At the top of each field list in the upper part of the query window is an asterisk. This symbol is shorthand for selecting all the fields in the table or query with one entry on the field line. You can simply add the astrisk to the design grid to include all the fields from a list, or you can use the check boxes seen in the show row to indicate the fields that will be included in your recordset.

Next is the exclamation point (!) symbol. This symbol can be seen in most of the query commands pictured in the ribbon, and simply serves to remind you that a query must be run before it can create a recordset based on the design stipulations. When you begin to work with queries it is important that you identify the run command located in the ribbon within the query group.

Queries are the best way to focus on the specific data you need for the task at hand. You’ll also find the queries are useful for providing choices for combo and list boxes, which makes entering data in your database much easier.

For more information on running queries and other basic functions of Microsoft Access check back with the Access Hosting blog or contact Access Hosting customer support for immediate assistance with issues concerning your cloud database.

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Microsoft Access Explained: Forms

Forms are the primary means by which Microsoft Access allows users to review the data within your database. Forms serve several functions. Although they can simply be a means to change and input data into your database just like tables, forms are usually bound to an underlying table or query.

The primary function of forms is to present information in a customizable and easily understood manner. You can set options in a form that make all or part of your data read-only, fill in related information from other tables automatically, calculate values to be displayed, or show and hide data depending on the settings selected by a user. Remember that there are forms that will only work within the Access desktop client and then specific web compatible forms (Access 2010 Web Databases) and Web App forms (Access 2013 Web Apps) that offer less functionality but work with Sharepoint Hosting environments.

You can design forms that work with macros to automate the display of certain data or the sequence of certain actions. You can create special controls on your form, called command buttons, which run a macro or a basic visual procedure when a user clicks them. With these commands you can open other forms, run queries or data macros, restrict the data that is displayed, execute commands from the ribbon, display customized ribbons, print records, or perform a host of other actions.

You can also display messages on forms. Microsoft Access provides a MessageBox macro action and basic visual function that you can use to display information, warnings, or error messages. Although you will inevitably design and use reports to print most information about your relational databases, the ability to print with custom messages on forms is sometimes more desirable. Also, you can specify one set of options when Microsoft Access displays a form and another set of options when Access prints a form, so a form can serve a dual role. For example, you might design a form with two sets of headers and footers, one set for entering an order and another set for printing a customer invoice from the order.

To create a form, simply open the desired table, click on the create tab and find the forms group in the center of the ribbon.

At first the form might look a lot like a regular table, but if you enter design view you can see that it provides a many things that are unavailable in table design. Its structure is broken into three parts: header, footer, and detail.

Headers and footers are common features in forms, but the detail section is the most important. This is the part that is repeated for each record in our tables. To change the properties of the fields (which fall under the details bar) right click your chosen field and find the properties command. This will open up a property sheet on the right side of the screen. From here you can see all of the properties you can control with Microsoft Access, for whatever your selection type may be. You can also view the properties of the entire form by entering the properties command of the entire form. Here you can change the text that appears in the header of your form, as well as several of the more advanced properties.

Experiment with forms and you will quickly begin to realize all the benefits this aspect of Microsoft Access can contribute, and don’t forget to check back in with Access Hosting for more helpful hints about all that Microsoft Access can do for your business! Please feel free to experiment with any of our 30-day free trials.

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Microsoft Access Explained: Creating Items and The Wizard

To create a any new item in Microsoft Access, simply open the desired item from the navigation pane, click on the create tab in the ribbon, and find the appropriate group from the selections in black lettering at the bottom. Within each group there are four main ways of creating a new item.

The first is the basic command. This allows you to create a new form, table, query or report, and allows you to enter information for one record at a time. The next is the design command. This command opens the new item in design view and allows you to layout the new item in exactly the way that you want by adding controls and restrictions or tweaking the properties of the new item. Then there is the blank command, which gives you a completely blank version of the new item and allows you to begin working completely from scratch.

Finally, there is the Wizard. It’s a very helpful way of creating new items in Microsoft Access.

The Wizard is a command that allows you to create a new item from a series of dialog boxes. The first dialog will give you a list of all the available fields within the table that you can provide. To select a field simply highlight the name on the left side of the dialog and click the right arrow button to move the selected item over into the selected fields category. After clicking the next command at the bottom right of the dialogue box, you are given a choice of layouts. From there, you can name your new item and you choose to modify its design.

To change the properties of the fields, right click your chosen field and find the properties command. This will open up a property sheet on the right side of the screen. From here you can see all of the properties you can control with Microsoft Access, for whatever your selection type may be. If you were looking at a text box you would be able to see the name and the control source. There are also more common commands such as text align or font color or size.

Finally, you should also be aware of the navigation command within the groups under the create tab. This will allow you to control the front end of your database and what users are allowed to do with in your web database’s parameters.

Check back in with Access Hosting for more valuable information about how to optimize your Microsoft Access experience, get the most out of your company’s information, and better serve your business! Remember that we offer free trials and recommendations on how to get your MS Access database on the web.

 

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Working Offline with Microsoft Access online database

Becoming comfortable with working offline and syncing to an online database with SharePoint later is essential if you often travel or work in areas with intermittent Internet access. Newer versions of Microsoft Access make this transition nearly seamless and help you avoid losing any work. However, there are a few tips that you should know that will allow you to tweak how Microsoft Access works with any website database.

Before you begin using Microsoft Access, you should be aware of two common hazards of working offline. First, if you share a database with coworkers, they may accidentally make conflicting edits when you’re working on a database. When working online, you can recognize these conflicts almost instantly, but you may generate multiple record conflicts when working offline that will create additional work and double-checking. Second, synchronizing with an online database can time out, so you may have to limit the amount of records you edit at one time. The solution to both of these potential issues is to sync offline work with the online database on a regular basis.

Offline Mode with MS Access 2013 and 2010

Since the 2010 edition, Microsoft Access web database automatically places you in offline mode when the computer is not connected to the Internet. Please note that you’re still restricted to online-use only if you’re using the 2013 Microsoft Access web app.  Unfortunately, the offline functionality of Access 2013 Web Apps is non-existent.  If you are disconnected, your frontend reports and forms will stop working/rendering.  The 2013 Web App acts very similarly to connecting your backend data via ODBC or SQL – if that connection isn’t live, you can’t edit or access the data.

The Microsoft Access web database saves any table changes locally using a jet table. The program indicates offline mode with a status bar at the bottom of the screen. Then when you reconnect to the Internet, Microsoft Access will immediately try to reconnect with SharePoint 2010. If Microsoft Access is successful in connecting with the server, you will see a yellow box that asks if you want to send your changes to the server, close open objects and synchronize with the server. If you want to upload your changes to the server, click on the “Synchronize” button.

If you do not see this prompt, go to the “File” menu and choose the “Reconnect All Tables” option.

If you prefer to work offline, bypass online mode in Microsoft Access by clicking on the “External Data” tab. Select the “Web Linked Lists” group and click the “Work Offline” option.

To resume working online, navigate back to the “Web Linked Lists” group. Then click on the “Work Online” option, which will be exactly where the “Work Offline” option appeared before.

To sync database changes, select the “Synchronize” command in the “Web Linked Lists” group on the “External Data” tab.

To discard database changes, select the “Discard changes” command instead.

Working with MS Access 2007 or Earlier

Older versions of Microsoft Access do not have the automatic offline mode. Instead, you should specify when you want to work offline on a SharePoint database, and Microsoft Access will use XML caching to save your work. When working in areas with an intermittent Internet connection, consider working in offline mode and regularly syncing your work to avoid losing any data. Another option is to use one of Access Hosting’s Remote Desktop clients to protect your work and automatically backup your files to any cloud-based storage service when online.

To work offline, open the database on SharePoint and click the “Work Offline” option located on the External Data tab.

To resume working online, go back to the “External Data” tab and select the “Work Online” option.

To update the database with your work and see any changes made by coworkers, select the “Synchronize” option on the “External Data” tab.

If you prefer the greater control of the earlier XML caching, you can turn off the caching in the Microsoft Access 2010 and 2013 versions by navigating to “Access Options,” selecting “Current Database” on the left side and unchecking the box next to the option that says, “Use the cache format that is compatible with Microsoft Access 2010 and later.”

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3 Quick Ways to Verify the Integrity of Your MS Access Database

Many businesses rely on Microsoft Access to make critical decisions about their operations, from customer service production to lead and order management. The integrity of your online database, in terms of quality and security, is critical to the overall benefit that MS Access provides. For instance, if the information entered contains errors or referential data is missing, any queries or reports generated will contain issues.

For this reason, businesses must find ways to monitor the quality and security of their MS Access database. Here are three quick and easy ways to check MS Access database integrity today.

1. Check Places With Common Errors

First, it is worthwhile to review the quality and functionality for areas of the MS Access database that are liable to face issues from human error. By focusing on places and fields most likely to encounter errors, administrators can more easily and regularly check for potential issues that compromise database integrity. One of the features that most commonly faces integrity issues is anywhere referential data is used, since these data segments can allow one error to multiply and cause other issues.

For instance, in an MS Access database that is tracking active customer orders, a small mistake could have been entered in the client’s mailing address. If this information remains uncorrected, future product shipments and promotional mailings will fail to reach this customer. Furthermore, all data points and reports generated from this mistake will be inaccurate. This includes the conversion rates for marketing promotions, the number of customers who call to check on their order, and the demographic and location breakdowns of customer geographies.

2. Utilize Strategies to Secure Your Database

The overall security posture of your database dictates its integrity. Without a thoroughly secured database, the data contained within can be corrupted or accessible by others. There are three strategies that most MS Access users can deploy to better secure the database.

  • First, reset settings using an AutoExec macro. You can accomplish this by naming a new macro AutoExec. This will check and reset the security properties that the last work session may have changed.
  • Second, local databases should remain password protected to prevent unauthorized access. Anytime a user is terminated, a new password should be chosen. Enable your MS Access database password by visiting the security section from the tools menu inside of MS Access. Select the option to “set database password” and enter your new password.
  • Third, consider the security of the database itself. If some of the information needs to be accessible to only certain users, split the database using the Database Splitter feature to limit who has access. Remember that split databases don’t work with Sharepoint but are are compatible with our RDP hosting solution.

3. Verify Quality of Backups

No matter what internal policies and procedures are used to secure a database, something could potentially always happen. This is why it is critical to never assume that backups are completed correctly and that they are accessible. For this reason, one quick way to monitor the integrity of the MS Access database is to check on the quality and existence of backups. This is even true for those using a SharePoint app to host their database and make it accessible to other users. Double coverage is never problematic and may prevent major disruptions from occurring in the production environment.

MS Access databases can be powerful tools for business. They offer a streamlined way to manage and report on the data that businesses rely on. However, just like any other technology or resource, they can be prone to challenges if not properly maintained and tested. Using these three quick tips is a great way to start checking the integrity of your database. Once these tips are part of your regular maintenance routine, feel free to explore additional ways across this site to improve upon your business’s understanding and usage of the great tools that MS Access databases offer.

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Microsoft Access Explained: The Ribbon

access ribbon

The ribbon is a Quick Access Toolbar shown at the  top of the Microsoft Access main screen. The ribbon contains some of the most widely used commands in Microsoft Access, and is divided into three main sections: tabs, groups and buttons or commands.

You may notice in small black lettering at the base of the ribbon each of the six main tabs are broken down into small groups. Have a look at these group names to assist you in finding the command you are trying to execute. Enabled commands are shown in black or full-color while other commands are greyed out. That is because these are contextual commands that are not always applicable to what you are trying to do. If the command you are looking for is grayed out be sure that you have the appropriate field or object selected.

Similarly, there are contextual tabs that only appear in certain view modes, and contextual menus with their own lists of commands hidden within certain parts of the ribbon. To access the contextual menus simply right click and a drop-down menu will appear next to your mouse cursor.

After you have familiarized yourself with the many functions of the ribbon you may like to take a look at the contextual drop-down menu by right clicking on one of the tabs. From there you can minimize the ribbon to give yourself more space to work in your main window or customize the ribbon to include the commands that you are using for a specific task.

Customizing the ribbon can save you precious time and improve your efficiency when doing repetitive tasks specific to the database you happen to be working on. Simply right click on the ribbon, click the “customize ribbon” command, and select “add new tab” from the menu screen. From there you’ll be given a list of all the commands Microsoft Access has to offer and you can add your most used or favorite commands into your own specialized tab. When you close out of the menu your new tab will appear on the ribbon next to the others.

If you enjoyed this explanation, don’t forget to check back in with Access Hosting for more helpful hints about operating the Microsoft Access software.

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Microsoft Access: Why It’s the Best Database Solution for Small Business

Microsoft Access Web Database Northwind traders 2013

Microsoft Access, a database management system (DBMS), has been around a long time — since the early 1990s. It has stood the test of time, as it’s still considered to be the best of the breed. MS Access has become even more important to businesses as a result of the evolution of databases and developers. While it is often shunned by IT professionals and the software has a few disadvantages, Access offers a number of benefits and remains very popular. Learn how to use Access as an inexpensive solution to increase ROI and integrate with other software programs without the need for complex programming.

No Complex Programming Required

MS Access is a top choice for business leaders, data managers and marketers who need an advanced way to collect, manage and report data. It is easy to install and create databases because it doesn’t require programming knowledge. In as little as a few minutes, managers can have a working database set up and ready to go locally or with one of the many cloud database solutions included in MS Access. It’s the perfect solutions for a wide range of users, from individuals to medium-sized companies. Power users have the ability to use it to develop application software and software applications to meet the database needs of larger clients.  Be sure to check out the power of our Access Cloud services with a free trial.

Inexpensive Solutions to Increase ROI

Unlike other database solutions, Microsoft Access is a very inexpensive option. It can save companies hundreds of dollars while offering much of the same capabilities. Smaller companies with limited budgets can take advantage of all that MS Access has to offer, such as implementation of an online database using a remote desktop client (our solution starts at only $29/month). There is no need for costly development, modifications or changes to any databases already in existence. Overall, this helps managers to increase their ROI, whether they use it for general business applications or to market their products and services.

Easy Integration With Other Microsoft Products

One of the most powerful features of Access is that it can be easily integrated with Microsoft Office, SharePoint and even other non-Microsoft programs like Oracle. SharePoint integration helps managers to share data, in addition to collecting and generating reports. When set up as an online database using cloud-based Sharepoint hosting, the opportunities are endless. Multiple users can access the database at the same time online without the need for separate desktop applications for each user. In addition, MS Access makes it a breeze to import data. For example, data can be conveniently collected via email and entered into the database through Microsoft Outlook.

Advantages Outweigh Any Disadvantages

The pros of using Microsoft Access far outweigh the cons, but a few are worth mentioning. File storage tops off at about 2GB for an Access Database, after which managers will run into some limitations or need to move the data to Microsoft SQL. These disadvantages typically won’t present problems for small- to mid-size companies, so there’s no reason not to consider using Access web databases.

Whether big or small, business managers can attain their bottom line with the help of Microsoft Access databases. Online database solutions and software integration can be implemented well within company budgets. While Microsoft Access is not without a few disadvantages, its ease of use and quick setup make the decision to use MS Access a no-brainer.

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How to Connect MS Access to InfoPath

With Microsoft Office InfoPath, you can design a form that is connected to a Microsoft Office Access database. By using these two programs together, you get all of the data collection advantages of InfoPath along with the data storage advantages of Access.

InfoPath advantages include forms that can be filled out while users are offline, a rich set of controls that make it easy to design and fill out forms, and data validation rules that are automatically imported when the form is connected to the Access database.

When you connect an InfoPath form to an Access database, you can choose whether you want to set up the database as the form’s main data source or secondary data source. If you want to edit and add records to the database by filling out fields in the InfoPath form, you should set up the database as the form’s main data source.

To use an Access database as the primary data source for an InfoPath form, you must start with a new form. You cannot modify an existing form to add a connection to a primary data source. Use the following procedure to create a new InfoPath form based on the sample database in Access:

infopathdesignform

  1. From the File menu under New, click Design a Form.
  2. In the Data tab of the ribbon, click Data Connections and then push the Add button.
  3. Select receive or submit data and then select Database as the data source (Microsoft SQL Server or Microsoft Office Access only), and then click Next. Remember that you can always use our SQL server hosting as well to keep all your data connected and stored in the cloud rather than in a local MS Access file.
  4. Use the browser to find and Select Database.
  5. In the Select Data Source dialog box, browse to a valid Access database and select it.2-3-2016 9-00-43 AM
  6. Then Select the Table that you would like to collect data via InfoPath2-3-2016 9-02-47 AM

In the screenshot above, I have selected the Authors Table from my Books Database. By selecting the Authors table first, I have setup this table as the primary table for the data connection. I can continue to add other tables via this data connection method to MS Infopath. Additional tables create a one-to-many relationship. In Access, this relationship is defined by using a key field, which is a field that associates the records in one table with the records in another table.

When connecting your form to multiple tables in a database, InfoPath requires that the tables be connected by key fields. Also, the primary table in the data connection must have either a one-to-many or a one-to-one connection with any additional tables that you add.

By default, InfoPath connects to every field in a table. However, you might want to exclude a field, either because it uses a data type that InfoPath cannot connect to or because you do not want to work with a certain field’s values in your form.

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MS Access Tips: Creating Relationships Between Tables

MS Access Table Relationships

One of the things I like most about MS Access is its ability for data storage, recall, and analysis and its ability to build relationships between multiple data tables. Relationships increase flexibility in working with data. For example, a table that includes names, address, and ZIP codes for customers could be linked to a table that includes accounting information for customers, making it easy for a business to generate and mail invoices.

Microsoft Access lets you build numerous types of relationships. You can link fields from two tables in a one-to-one relationship: one record in field A is always associated with the same record in field B. You can create one-to-many relationships: one record in field A could be associated with numerous records in field B. Finally, you can create many-to-many relationships.

To create one-to-one or one-to-many relationship tables in Access, begin by opening your database and clicking on Database Tools in the top menu. Below, you’ll see the Relationship ribbon. Click on the Relationships button, and select the option Show Tables. In the Show Tables dialogue box, select one of the Access tables you plan to work with and click Add. Repeat that process, adding all of the tables you plan to work with.

When creating a one-to-one or one-to-many relationship, simply click on the field in the first table that will be related to a field in the second table. Holding the left mouse button down, drag the pointer to hover over the related field in the second table. Access automatically creates a relationship, and all you have to do is ensure the fields you are relating have the same data type.

To create a many-to-many relationship, first create a new table in Access. The new table should have an ID field and fields for the two elements you plan to relate from two other tables. After creating the new table, follow the steps for showing tables and adding tables to the design box. Then, follow the steps for relating fields with mouse clicks. This time, click on a field in table one and relate it to the appropriate field in the new table you created. Next, click on a field in table two and relate it to the appropriate field in the new table you created. Again, ensure all related fields have the same data type.

Relationship tables make your database more than a glorified spreadsheet. Creating related tables lets you build powerful Access databases you can use for a variety of business and personal functions.  Best of all you can test all these powerful function using Access Hosting’s specialized MS Access hosting services with a free trial.

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5 Unconventional Ways Microsoft Access Can Power Your Business

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Since it’s inception, Microsoft Access has been the go-to database for businesses of all shapes and sizes. Not surprisingly, as Access’s features and cloud capability have rapidly expanded over the years, so too have the different ways the technology is used. Here are a few of our favorites:

1. Employee Training

There are few things more valuable to a business than properly onboarding and training new employees. While for most companies the ROI on hiring and app developer for a training application wouldn’t be high enough to justify the cost, building them in house is an appealing option. And as the company’s hiring scales, moving the backend of the app to a server like Microsoft SQL Server will be a low-cost way to scale your training app with it.

2. Customer Relationship Management

For many small businesses, CRMs like Salesforce or Microsoft Dynamics are either too expensive or too cumbersome to implement. However, having accurate, up-to-date customer and prospect information is crucial to running client-facing departments . As an MS Access user, it’s more than likely that much of this data already exists there. By standardizing this information and creating relational tables for objects like leads and deals, you too can have a CRM without the cost and learning curve.

3. Displaying Access to Data

While we’re on the subject of prospects and customers, many of them will want to access some of the data that you store in your web database – for example, recent invoices or the date of their next appointment. You can easily deliver this data easily by offering them a form they can fill out on your site. ASP.NET forms can query a Microsoft Access online database directly, so by implementing them on your site, you can surface this data to your customers with limited effort from your developers.

4. Business Intelligence

If you’re like many, you’re using an endless string of VLOOKUPs in Excel to report on related data from different tables or sources. This is really a job for Microsoft Access’ relational tables. Built on top of Microsoft’s Jet Database Engine, you can use these powerful tools to easily create queries that quite literally fly.

5. Development Waterfalls

If you’re in software development, one common practice you’re likely familiar with is creating waterfall models to manage the progress of an application. Since you may be creating an application that leverages Access or SQL Servers as your backend, why not keep track of your app’s progress there as well?

These are just a few of many ideas for uses for MS Access – the beauty of the software is that it’s uses are really only limited to the imagination<.

Posted in Access 2010, Access 2013, Access 2016, Access Developer, blog, SQL Hosting, SQL Server 2012 | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Using Google Chromebooks with our RDP hosting Plans

Chrome RDP

We recently had a question about using Chromebooks to access our Remote Desktop Hosting and if they work.  The answer is that they absolutely do if you grab an RDP App and install it on your Google Chromebook.  It’s actually a great and cheap way to give your employees a laptop where they can still access a file server and the Microsoft Office Suite since all they need is an internet connection.  Here are the very few quick steps to use a Chromebook with your RDP hosting plan:

1. Download the Chrome RDP App from the Chrome webstore: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/chrome-rdp/cbkkbcmdlboombapidmoeolnmdacpkch?hl=en-US

2. Write down or copy the IP address and port from the RDP link that you received when you signed up for an account.  Type/paste that information in the first startup screen:

Chrome RDP

3. Click connect and then enter your login credentials.  Your username prefix should be used as the domain.

logininfo

4. Click OK to connect to the Windows Server and your RDP hosting environment.

Windows on Chromebook

 

 

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What is the differences between Access Hosting’s SharePoint and Office 365

I was recently having a very good chat with a potential customer that had some very good questions regarding Access and Office 365.  This person already had an Access app and was looking to share it online in the browser and was thinking that SharePoint was the best solution but was confused about what they needed exactly since they had an Office 365 plan with a few users with just email and a few more with Sharepoint and more.  It was such a good conversation that I thought it would be good to clarify some of the differences between Office 365 and our SharePoint 2013 Enterprise hosting plan for Access Web Databases and Web apps.

Cost Savings over Office 365

The most confusing part of the comparison is that the varying plans for Office 365 are quite confusing in and of themselves.  Office 365 is a sort of all encompassing term used to describe a lot of different products from Microsoft.  It can be as simple as a subscription to Microsoft Office software or a complicated enterprise plan with access to Exchange, Sharepoint, Yammer, and more.  If you’re interested in Access Web Databases or 2013 Web Apps, the first thing to determine is whether your Office 365 plan even includes SharePoint Enterprise.  You need to have either an Office 365 Business Premium plan ($12.50-$15 per user per month) or an Office 365 Enterprise Plan ($20 per user per month) to have access to the correct version of SharePoint with Access Services.  Obviously if you have a small business where you have 10 users or less and need email, exchange and everything in between, Office 365 is the better deal, but for a lot of people they need something more flexible.

Let’s say you have Office 365 and are paying $15-$20 per user and have an Access database that you want to host in SharePoint as a web app and share with some of your clients outside of your organization.  How do you do that if they don’t have their own Microsoft account/Office 365 account?  Our $99 SharePoint hosting plan has been tailor made for Access Services 2013 and 2010 and offers substantial cost savings over Office 365.  Right off the bat our $99 plan includes 10 users ($50 – $100 less than Office 365), and each additional user is only $3 per user per month vs. the $15-$20 per user Office 365 plans.  Best of all, you don’t need to pay for all the extra features of Office 365 that you don’t need for you and your clients.

Access Services 2013 and 2010 running Side by Side

Another cool feature about our $99 Sharepoint plan is that you can run 2013 Access Web Apps right alongside Access 2010 Web Databases since our 2013 SharePoint environment is running both versions of Access services.  We’ve already written about the differences of this technology in a previous post: picking between Access 2013 Web Apps and Access 2010 Web Databases.

Comparing Access Hosting to Office 365

Here’s a few more points about our implementation of SharePoint over Microsoft Office 365. An On Premise or 3rd Party Hosted Access Services 2013 implementation helps provide focused, reliable solutions for the following common customer needs:

  1. Web Based Reports: SQL Server Reporting Services can be used to create reports and link them back into the menu structure of the web app. Access 2013 web databases use the browser as the primary interface to the client. This environment provides an excellent cross platform solution that allows users to participate without a copy of Access on their desktop and create/read/update/delete records in the database, but it lacks a mechanism for reporting on that data. With SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS) you have the ability to deliver browser based reports to your users alongside the Access 2013 web database forms.
  2. Anonymous Access: With this feature enabled Access web databases can be viewed by an anonymous read-only user without requiring authentication. We recently had a customer looking to provide an up to date inventory of their video game and pinball machine inventory to their web site visitors. With Access Services 2013 and anonymous access enabled inside the SharePoint web application, web visitors could view the entire catalog of available games and pricing information without authenticating to SharePoint. This is a powerful feature for any organization that wants to make their product inventory visible to any web visitor, delivering the information quickly and seamlessly without complicating the end user experience.
  3. Full control of SQL Server security: Access 2012 allows for the automatic creation of 2 SQL Server user accounts, one with read-only privileges and another with read-write.  While that is useful, some customers would like to extend this model to multiple user accounts. By creating multiple SQL logins via SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS)  you can create a much more complex security model for applications that want to leverage the Access 2013 web database information stored in SQL Server. Password complexity and aging requirements can also be enforced on these accounts.
  4. Full control of the network firewall: Many Access 2013 applications require extended security to comply with corporate or regulatory requirements. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) security requirements are a good example of this necessity. In a self-hosted or 3rd party hosted solution you have enough firewall configuration flexibility to lock down your entire database by imposing restrictions on the network perimeter based on TCP/IP address ranges, machine names, and network protocols. A combination of these restrictions can be imposed to address any security mandate.
  5. Render http links in the web browser control of an Access 2013 web database: The browser control is a powerful feature in Access 2013 web forms that allows you to call external resources into your application. Office 365 requires https for all external links which limits the use of browser based resources that do not support https.  This restriction can be lifted in a self-hosted or 3rd party hosted configuration.
  6. Customized backup: You can create a backup rotation scheme in SQL 2012 for the Access Web Apps that mirrors the site collection backup routine in SharePoint. This allows for a synchronized full fidelity backup of the SharePoint site and the Web Apps with multiple restore points. We recently assisted a customer who required a complete snapshot of their SharePoint and Access Services environment to be available for rollback to 24/47/72/96 hour recovery points. In addition, the second and fourth snapshots needed to be available in a secondary data center in the event of a problem with the primary facility. All of this is easily accomplished in a hosted configuration where both the SharePoint and SQL Server environments are completely controlled by the hosting organization.
  7. Ability to change Access Services configuration parameters and SharePoint web application settings:  When running Access Services 2010 alongside Access Services 2013 you maintain complete control of the SharePoint service parameters for Access Services. These parameters can be tuned to enhance the interaction between Access 2010 and SharePoint lists and  eliminate the “List Threshold Exceeded” errors that can appear when using the default configuration settings and manipulating large tables. Full support for web based reporting in published Access 2010 Web Databases and permissive file handling for things like PDF can also be enabled when you have full control over the entire SharePoint Central Administration console.
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